Coronavirus comparison

Coronavirus has been the topic of a lot of media discussion lately. To help bring some balance into the input from media, I thought that I would show side-by-side the death rate from coronavirus as compared to regular flu in the United States over the past few years. While I am not at all dismissive of the concerns or need for health precautions, I do feel that it can be helpful to reduce fear levels to compare the infection and death rates from flu in previous years to the current pandemic.

Again, I am not saying not to take health precautions as advised. I am only saying that instead of fear, let us keep a focus on God while being wise with our health. Anyway, below is some of the data that I was able to find for comparison.

2020- Coronavirus2018-20192017
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/coronavirus-us-cases.html article online on 3/28/20 As of Saturday afternoon, at least 119,525 people across every state, plus Washington, D.C., and four U.S. territories, have tested positive for the virus, according to a New York Times  database, and at least 1,989 patients with the virus have died.   As of March 16, a total of 4,226 COVID-19 cases in the United States had been reported to CDC, with multiple cases reported among older adults living in long-term care facilities (4). Overall, 31% of cases, 45% of hospitalizations, 53% of ICU admissions, and 80% of deaths associated with COVID-19 were among adults aged ≥65 years with the highest percentage of severe outcomes among persons aged ≥85 years. In contrast, no ICU admissions or deaths were reported among persons aged ≤19 years. Similar to reports from other countries, this finding suggests that the risk for serious disease and death from COVID-19 is higher in older age groups.CDC estimates that influenza was associated with more than 35.5 million illnesses, more than 16.5 million medical visits, 490,600 hospitalizations, and 34,200 deaths during the 2018–2019 influenza season https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/burden/2018-2019.html(New York Times article)Oct 1, 2018 – Over 80,000 Americans Died of Flu Last Winter, Highest Toll in … more than in any year since the C.D.C. began tracking pediatric deaths. … More than 80,000 Americans died of the flu in the winter of 2017-2018, the highest … https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5687497/ CDC tracks pneumonia and influenza (P&I)–attributed deaths through the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Mortality Reporting System. The percentages of deaths attributed to P&I are released 2 weeks after the week of death to allow for collection of sufficient data to produce a stable P&I mortality percentage. Weekly mortality surveillance data include a combination of machine-coded and manually coded causes of death collected from death certificates. During the 2016–17 season, there was a backlog of data requiring manual coding within the NCHS mortality surveillance data. Work is underway to reduce and monitor the number of records awaiting manual coding. The percentages of deaths attributable to P&I are higher among manually coded records than the more rapidly available machine coded records and might result in initially reported P&I percentages that are lower than percentages calculated from final data. During the 2016–17 season, based on data from NCHS, the proportion of deaths attributed to P&I was at or above the epidemic threshold†††† for 12 consecutive weeks from the week ending December 31, 2016 through the week ending March 18, 2017 (weeks 52–11). Mortality attributed to P&I peaked twice, once at 8.2% of all deaths during the week ending January 21, 2017 (week 3) and once at 8.1% during the week ending February 25, 2017 (week 8). During the 2011–12 through 2015–16 seasons, the peak weekly percentages of deaths attributable to P&I ranged from 8.7% during the 2011–12 season to 11.1% during the 2012–13 season.  

Some thoughts on fear

During the past few weeks, the media has extensively covered the coronavirus situation. While of course, it is important to take precautions, just as one should for flu, I also believe that during this time, it is important to rest on God’s promises in scripture.

Psalm 91 is one that is especially appropriate. Below, I have copied it, with the bold print my own emphasis. This psalm promises that if we put our trust in God, and dwell in Him (as occurs when we become Christians; we are then in Christ), that He will protect us.

I have heard several online videos about what the virus is supposed to mean. I choose not to share my own opinion here, but do feel that being in fear is not the answer. Instead, trusting the promises of (the true) God, that He will take care of us, is. As believers, we have great authority, and that includes over fear; we can choose to experience peace, and not panic.

My prayer is that this psalm is a blessing to each who reads it; it is very appropriate during this time.

Psalm 91

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High will rest in the shadow of the Almighty. I will say  of the LORD, “He is my refuge and my fortress, my God, in whom I trust.”Surely he will save you from the fowler’s snare and from the deadly pestilence.He will cover you with his feathers, and under his wings you will find refuge; his faithfulness will be your shield and rampart.You will not fear the terror of night, nor the arrow that flies by day, nor the pestilence that stalks in the darkness, nor the plague that destroys at midday. A thousand may fall at your side, ten thousand at your right hand, but it will not come near you.

You will only observe with your eyes and see the punishment of the wicked.If you make the Most High your dwelling– even the LORD, who is my refuge–then no harm will befall you, no disaster will come near your tent. For he will command his angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways;they will lift you up in their hands, so that you will not strike your foot against a stone.You will tread upon the lion and the cobra; you will trample the great lion and the serpent.”Because he loves me,” says the LORD, “I will rescue him; I will protect him, for he acknowledges my name. He will call upon me, and I will answer him; I will be with him in trouble, I will deliver him and honor him. With long life will I satisfy him and show him my salvation.”

Resources: Books to Promote Healing


Over the years, I have read numerous books that have been helpful during the healing journey. Here, I will share what I believe are among the best. This is not a comprehensive list; there are many other excellent books. If any seem interesting, you can search Amazon to find a copy.


First, several books that address important aspects of Christianity and Healing:


Rebuilding the Real You by Jack Hayford. Based on the book of Nehemiah, it provides an awesome illustration of what healing – even while struggling – looks like.


Praying God’s Word: Breaking Free from Spiritual Strongholds by Beth Moore. Moore provides a list of various topics, including rejection, depression, and many others, and provides extensive lists of scriptures to address each, stories from others who have dealt with the stronghold, and some prayers about the topic.


Grace and Forgiveness: Learning to Give the Gift of Forgiveness to Others and Ourselves by John and Carol Arnott. I have read this one three times; it is an excellent study on what forgiveness is, and is not; and has stories that show the benefits of choosing to forgive.


Outsmarting Yourself: Catching Your Past Invading the Present and What to Do About It by Karl Lehman, M.D. Lehman offers excellent insights into why we react the way we do, even when we are unaware; and how to pray to the roots of what is going on.


Walking with God through Pain and Suffering by Timothy Keller. Keller asks the really hard questions, and this book helped me through a time when I hated God because of the pain I had been through. It didn’t make it “all better” but it did provide insights and an understanding of the struggle that goes beyond the normal quick “pat” answer.


The Cry of the Soul: How Our Emotions Reveal Our Deepest Questions About God by Dan Allender and Tremper Longman. Allender’s books are always good, and again, he asks great questions that don’t minimize the impact of abuse, and shares how others have dealt with them.


Secular (Non-Christian) Books that Promote Understanding Healing


Becoming Yourself: Overcoming Mind Control and Ritual Abuse by Allison Miller. All of Miller’s books are excellent, and this is an outstanding workbook/self-help guide for survivors.


Coping with trauma-related dissociation: Skills training for patients and therapists by Suzette Boon, Kathy Steele and Onno van der Hart. Published by therapists, for therapists but with information helpful for survivors, it is a thick book filled with information about dissociation and how to work towards healing.

I would love to hear from others who read this blog on what books have been helpful to you, to share with others.

The Role of the Genetic Parents in Programming

In other articles, I have briefly discussed the role of the birth mother in programming, if prenatal programming is done by a group. But there are two other individuals who are also important to programming: the genetic father, and the genetic mother.

While often the genetic mother (who is a cult member) does not carry the child during pregnancy (this role is given to a “carrier” or “birth mother”), she will be an important part of both the prenatal and post-natal programming. During pregnancy, due to the generational inherited sin in their DNA, the genetic mother and father will be part of important programming sequences designed to foster both the acceptance and love (reward) and rejection and punishment that are foundational to programming. The unborn child and the newborn baby recognizes spiritually their genetic parents.

Once the child is born, the genetic parents are often present at the initial rituals done to “welcome” the infant into the world with a sacrifice. They may state how glad they are to finally see the infant; but they also make clear the spiritual and performance expectations for the infant from its first breath. The genetic father may place a demand upon the newborn to receive a demonic spirit, in return for life. Both genetic parents, as well as the primary trainers (the parents may also be trainers) will blame the infant for the death of the birth mother, causing confusion: the infant knows that the adults at the birth did the real murder, and the infant then comes to realize that the adults he or she depend upon for survival are not only dangerous, they are liars. In order to survive this unbearable reality, the newborn will often dissociate.

The genetic parents teach the infant a terrible reality: that survival requires pretending, listening to lies from the adults around the infant, and pretending to believe them. Part of the infant always knows the truth: that the things they are told to believe are not true. But the infant’s survival depends upon pleasing its parents and trainers, and so the infant will dissociate, and create parts designed to make the lies believable.

For example, in a typical setup during infancy, an infant will be told that one of the other infants is “bad” and “deserves to die”. The infants in the room are all aware of the real truth: this other baby was just being a normal baby, it did nothing worthy of death. Infants are incapable of adult thought and predetermined action, as imputed to the supposedly “evil” baby. But in order to survive, the infants all agree to believe this lie, and watch wide-eyed as one of the other infants is put to death in front of the others. The message to believed is given during this trauma: “bad” (disobedient) babies die, and “good” (obedient babies” live. This message is incorporated into traumatized parts.

When the genetic mother or father tell their child that he or she is loved, or good, or accepted, the child responds in a unique way. Biologically, the infant is wired to respond to these individuals, and spiritually, their spirit understands that these are the individuals whose DNA conceived them.  Messages of love and acceptance have even greater importance than from others, especially if the infant is allowed to interact with them to any great degree.

The genetic parents will most often be the individuals who give the child over to Satan or another spiritual entity that the cult group worships.  This follows a spiritual principle, in which the genetic parents have the greatest spiritual authority over the child, and their doing so gives the ceremony a greater spiritual impact, keeping the generational iniquity for the bloodline continuing.

It is often the genetic mother or father who first chains a child to an idol, or leaves the child alone in a room where a demonic entity is expected to enter, and “teach” the child. This spiritual giving the child up to the demonic becomes an important area to address, when becoming free of this type of control.

Becoming free of generational occultic abuse will include looking at the role that the genetic parents held, and breaking all soul ties, sexual ties, ritual ties, and others. It will involve breaking the curses, vows, covenants and agreements made by and with the genetic parents.  Finally, at some point, the survivor will need to be willing to forgive their genetic parents for the abuse, manipulation of attachment needs, and dysfunctional role modeling that occurred.  This forgiveness cannot be rushed, though, as the survivor needs time to examine both the love, and the hate, that they felt for these individuals. The need to dissociate between loving and hating the genetic parents (and other cult caretakers) in order to survive, is one of the foundations of early dissociation, and healing this will take time.

Healing from Dissociation: Some Steps

Note: this is an excerpt from the New Training Manual for those who support survivors that will be published next year. Used with permission.

Healing from Dissociation: Some Steps in the Process

People don’t dissociate when they realize they no longer need it. The issues that cause dissociation to continue include emotional conflicts that the dissociation solves (such as how to continue to live with an abusive parent or spouse; or the desire to prevent torture or punishment of the self or loved ones by an abusive cult).

To heal, these conflicts will need to be resolved over time, as trust is built.  This normally happens within the context of a safe counseling relationship, supported by the survivor’s “community” or people who are safe and supportive that they interact with.

The goal in healing is to allow some attachment to individuals who do not hurt the survivor, while the tasks of building the skills for doing inside work and developing safe support are worked on. As the survivor builds trust and confidence, and feels safe, they will often share more of their internal reality with the counselor. This is a collaborative process: the client is encouraged to share without feeling judged or criticized.

As trust and safety are experienced, some of the deeper issues the survivor struggles with will often come forward. The survivor may fear attachment within a relationship, and may sabotage relationships that support healing (by acting hostile; withdrawing; forgetting appointments, or pushing “hot buttons” for supporters). As healing progresses, and internal parts come forward to “meet the counselor” or friends of the survivor, they may project feelings onto others that they themselves experience. Examples can be when one part of the survivor cares about and trusts the therapist, but another part comes out that is hostile, convinced the counselor is trying to “trick” them into trusting, or will eventually hurt the survivor. This is a form of re-experiencing in the present emotions and feelings that are caused by past events, and the survivor will need help in sorting out what is past, and what is present, reality in relationships.

If the client is seeking reparenting, they may discover that if they are in crisis, the counselor responds more quickly; and may develop constant “crises” in order to receive attention or support. If this occurs, the counselor can address this directly, provide compassionate feedback regarding the behavior, and develop a plan with appropriate boundaries that will meet the needs of both the survivor and the counselor.

Early Phase of Working with a Survivor

Many survivors will state that their goal is to “integrate” and “get better”; often as quickly as possible. What many counselors and survivors do not realize is that healing – and the process of integration – begins during the first session with a therapist or prayer minister and continues over time. It is a process, not a “point in time”.

Early in counseling, safety issues will always take first priority. Because many individuals with severe trauma and DID struggle with self harm issues and/or feeling suicidal, it is a good idea to ask directly: “Do you ever want to hurt yourself?” or “Do you ever feel suicidal?” during the initial history. If the individual indicates they struggle with these issues, a full suicide risk assessment should be done, and a plan to prevent acting on these impulses developed. This will include a list of who to call if they feel this way (including crisis help lines); and referral to a mental health professional if you do not have clinical training.

If the survivor has an eating disorder that has caused their weight to go dangerously low, there may need to be planning done, that includes hospitalization if the weight goes below a certain point. The survivor may need to attend alcoholics anonymous, narcotics anonymous, or in a program to help them give up addictive behaviors, if present.

The counselor should also assess whether abuse is still ongoing when an individual presents with DID. This includes asking whether their spouse ever physically beats, slaps, threatens, rapes or otherwise hurts them; or whether there are threats or physical abuse from family members if the individual is living at home. At times, the individual with DID may initially be unaware that they are currently being abused, and over time, this information will be shared as trust is built. It is important to do safety planning, and provide referrals as needed (such as to a women’s shelter, etc.), to provide physical safety for the individual.

Emotional safety is also important. The survivor may need to learn skills in setting healthy and appropriate boundaries in order to feel emotionally safe. This may range from helping someone recently divorced from an abusive spouse realize that they can arrange to have a friend with them when their spouse comes by to pick up a child in a joint custody arrangement, to helping a survivor decide how much contact, if any, they wish to have with an extremely abusive family of origin.

Beginning education about dissociation and DID, if these are present, should be done as well. Many times, individuals struggling with DID will believe that the symptoms they experience (such as hearing internal voices, losing time, or acting like completely different people) mean that they are “crazy” and they will be afraid. Helping the individual you are working with understand what causes dissociation, and that it is a treatable disorder with a good prognosis, will help relieve some of this anxiety. Take time to answer the questions and concerns that are often raised. 

Once safety is established, the survivor will need to learn some basic skills before they begin to work on trauma memories (ISSTD, 2011). These skills include:

Learning to identify the emotions they are experiencing. Many survivors have never learned to be aware of when they are feeling emotions, or how to label them. They often describe feeling “numb” or “a little funny”, but have never been able to share “I feel sad”; “I feel angry” “I feel helpless” with someone who is safe. Learning how to be in the body, and how to identify emotions, is an important skill that can be learned. Emoticon charts can be used for this purpose; or, asking the survivor to stop and try to identify what they are feeling from time to time. Over time, the survivor will use this skill to identify the emotions they felt during trauma as it is brought up into conscious awareness, for processing.

Starting to build communication inside between parts. Studies have shown that individuals with DID who do the best work with their dissociative states (Gabbard, 2014; Steele, Boon, Van der Hart, 2017;  Knipes, 2015). This is a process, with the individual first indicating when they are aware of a switch; or, they may try to depict parts using various methods such as drawing a house to represent them, and creating pictures of who lives in the house. Some survivors prefer to collage; or to use dolls to depict who is inside. Right brain activities, such as art, music or inside imagery can be used to help get to know “who is inside”. Some survivors imagine a conference table inside, and invite others to come and join them at the table, letting Jesus be in charge of the meeting.

Building communication can be encouraged through journaling exercises, with parts invited to share what they like and don’t like; or what they wish for, as well as their fears and concerns. Collages can be created on themes such as “what childhood was like”, or “my favorite things” with various inside parts encouraged to share their thoughts and feelings.

It is important that both the helper and the survivor do not “judge” these parts, regardless of the conflicts or issues they present. For example, it is not uncommon for survivors of sexual trafficking to have highly sexualized parts inside whose only reality before coming forward has been to invite sexual activity. While the individual needs to take responsibility for the actions of these parts (which are part of him or her), it is important to not apply labels such as “bad” “demon” or attempt to “get rid of the part making all the trouble”. Instead, it helps to adopt an attitude of caring curiosity, to help explore with the survivor how this part helped them cope with what was overwhelming to them. Once they realize they are not being condemned, or judged, and their concerns are listened to and addressed these parts will often quickly agree to help others inside, and can become an important part of the healing process.

Identity or Demon?

Survivors of ritual abuse will often have internal identities programmed since early childhood to believe they are “demons” (see chapter on programming for more information). This parts needs to be differentiated from actual demons (the parts will likely have a demonic attachment), and treated with compassion as a coping response to an extremely painful reality. Often, the “demons” are actually young, frightened children inside who have been given difficult jobs internally such as punishing parts who disobey, or frighting parts who talk to people outside the cult group. Attempting deliverance on alternate identity states will not work (the parts will simply not budge, laugh at the minister, or go deep inside, feeling wounded, hurt and angry, and deciding that Christians cannot help them. Helping the survivor help these parts, valuing how they helped them survive their past  instead of trying to get rid of them, will promote communication, healing and stability inside.

Over time, the survivor may begin to have parts co-present, with two or more parts presenting at the same time. This can help build further trust, as the parts learn to work together and share information. Eventually, co-consciousness will develop, with the barriers between parts blurring as increasing amounts of information are shared, and parts actually “share the same mind” as they become aware of what the other is thinking and feeling, and may even blend temporarily.

By increasing communication, and working with the counselor, the traumas and conflicts that created the dissociation will eventually resolve.  As the conflicts are resolved, instead of constant fighting between parts (as may be seen early in counseling), increased cooperation between inside parts occurs, with working together for common goals.

Helping the survivor learn skills to cope with distressing emotions is also important before approaching any trauma memories during a session. These skills can include:

  • Learning to feel “grounded” (or, present in currently reality) when panic, rage or other intense or painful emotions come forward. This can be accomplished using various techniques, such as using touch (feeling a soft blanket; holding ice for a few seconds in the hands, feeling the feet on the floor); smell (smelling a fragrance; or a sharp smell such as a lemon); sight (opening the eyes if they are closed; looking around the room and identifying two objects that are blue, or any color chosen; looking out the window and describing three things seen, etc.); hearing (listening to music; describing two sounds they can hear). The main thing is that the survivor becomes aware of the present. If they seem “tranced out”, you can softly touch them on the shoulder and speak their name (get permission beforehand to do this, and explain why you will be doing it). It is best to practice these techniques together, and then ask the individual to practice them at home during the week, especially if they feel triggered or experience emotions or flashbacks.
  • Mindfulness techniques: this is being aware of being present in the body, in the present moment. Doing this can be combined with thinking about a comforting or helpful scripture the survivor chooses, to help them stay in the current moment.
  • Deep breathing: when someone feels anxious, they often will breathe rapidly. Learning to take slow, deep breaths while being aware of the feeling of taking air in and out can help a person feel calmer. This can be combined with grounding thoughts such as “it isn’t happening now, it’s in the past” (if a flashback is occurring) or “I can make it; this feeling won’t last forever.”
  • Containment exercises: using visual imagery can help with containing emotions or memories that feel overwhelming, until they can be worked on together with a support person. This can include creating a box to place the feeling in temporarily, with the promise to open it later when someone else is present to help (this promise needs to be followed up on); or creating a room where memories and emotions can stay until they can be worked on in a safe setting.

During this early part of healing work, and throughout the healing journey, the survivor will be working on building trust with you and their support people. This includes learning how to have a healthy relationship, which is something the individual may have never experienced before. It is not uncommon for a survivor to enter into prayer ministry or counseling with behaviors learned over a lifetime to keep people away (which felt safer), and to struggle with self-sabotaging the efforts of others who care and want to help.

Learning healthy relational skills is learned by teaching (explaining what healthy boundaries are; or how to approach confrontation in a healthy way) and by modeling: the survivor will be watching you closely to see how you respond to different situations for cues on how “normal” people act, especially if they are aware that their family of origin was dysfunctional. As the survivor interacts with individuals who are not dissociative and who are safe, such as friends they develop who are not part of their past abuse, they will also have an opportunity to practice these skills. They will then begin bringing into sessions the conflicts, hopes and fears that these interactions bring up, which allows further opportunities to learn relational skills, and promote healing inside.

If the survivor is in a non-abuse marriage, and they report conflicts or the marriage is failing, you may want to refer them for marriage counseling. There are also resources available in print and online for the spouses of individuals with DID, that can help them better understand the issues. It is a good idea to have at least one or more sessions with the spouse present, when the survivor feels ready, to discuss their condition and what can be done to help support them, and to answer questions and concerns.

Part of learning relational skills will include the host/presentation learning to take responsibility as a whole for the actions of all parts. If the survivor is a parent, they will need to learn to act as an adult around their children; and learn appropriate boundaries for behaviors. This is usually accomplished over time as communication with parts is established, and negotiation with parts regarding behaviors can be done.

Dealing with Negative Self Thoughts

Most survivors of severe trauma struggle with negative messages about themselves: “I’m ugly” “I’m worthless” “I’m nothing but a whore” “Only Satan could love me, everyone else hates me” “I will never heal, I’ve been hurt too badly and there’s no hope”, etc. While healing of the issues and traumas will be how full resolution occurs, initially, the individual can practice self-compassion, or thinking positive thoughts and using images of self-compassion to help reduce the strength of these messages.

This can include “God loves me, and so does ________”, filling in the blanks with supportive people in the survivor’s life. Or, “Even if I don’t feel this way yet, I am valuable, I have skills and gifts that are unique to me” “I survived my past, and can now survive remembering it, because I have support now, I’m not alone” “Nothing is impossible with God”, etc.  It can help to develop a list of these messages that the survivor keeps taped to a bathroom or other mirror as a reminder. Imagery can include taking some time to hold oneself, giving the self an internal “hug” and saying “It’s okay, I love you” “You did the best you could under very difficult circumstances, and it was good enough” “Each day, I’m healing a bit more” or other messages meaningful to the survivor.