Coronavirus comparison

Coronavirus has been the topic of a lot of media discussion lately. To help bring some balance into the input from media, I thought that I would show side-by-side the death rate from coronavirus as compared to regular flu in the United States over the past few years. While I am not at all dismissive of the concerns or need for health precautions, I do feel that it can be helpful to reduce fear levels to compare the infection and death rates from flu in previous years to the current pandemic.

Again, I am not saying not to take health precautions as advised. I am only saying that instead of fear, let us keep a focus on God while being wise with our health. Anyway, below is some of the data that I was able to find for comparison.

2020- Coronavirus2018-20192017
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/coronavirus-us-cases.html article online on 3/28/20 As of Saturday afternoon, at least 119,525 people across every state, plus Washington, D.C., and four U.S. territories, have tested positive for the virus, according to a New York Times  database, and at least 1,989 patients with the virus have died.   As of March 16, a total of 4,226 COVID-19 cases in the United States had been reported to CDC, with multiple cases reported among older adults living in long-term care facilities (4). Overall, 31% of cases, 45% of hospitalizations, 53% of ICU admissions, and 80% of deaths associated with COVID-19 were among adults aged ≥65 years with the highest percentage of severe outcomes among persons aged ≥85 years. In contrast, no ICU admissions or deaths were reported among persons aged ≤19 years. Similar to reports from other countries, this finding suggests that the risk for serious disease and death from COVID-19 is higher in older age groups.CDC estimates that influenza was associated with more than 35.5 million illnesses, more than 16.5 million medical visits, 490,600 hospitalizations, and 34,200 deaths during the 2018–2019 influenza season https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/burden/2018-2019.html(New York Times article)Oct 1, 2018 – Over 80,000 Americans Died of Flu Last Winter, Highest Toll in … more than in any year since the C.D.C. began tracking pediatric deaths. … More than 80,000 Americans died of the flu in the winter of 2017-2018, the highest … https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5687497/ CDC tracks pneumonia and influenza (P&I)–attributed deaths through the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Mortality Reporting System. The percentages of deaths attributed to P&I are released 2 weeks after the week of death to allow for collection of sufficient data to produce a stable P&I mortality percentage. Weekly mortality surveillance data include a combination of machine-coded and manually coded causes of death collected from death certificates. During the 2016–17 season, there was a backlog of data requiring manual coding within the NCHS mortality surveillance data. Work is underway to reduce and monitor the number of records awaiting manual coding. The percentages of deaths attributable to P&I are higher among manually coded records than the more rapidly available machine coded records and might result in initially reported P&I percentages that are lower than percentages calculated from final data. During the 2016–17 season, based on data from NCHS, the proportion of deaths attributed to P&I was at or above the epidemic threshold†††† for 12 consecutive weeks from the week ending December 31, 2016 through the week ending March 18, 2017 (weeks 52–11). Mortality attributed to P&I peaked twice, once at 8.2% of all deaths during the week ending January 21, 2017 (week 3) and once at 8.1% during the week ending February 25, 2017 (week 8). During the 2011–12 through 2015–16 seasons, the peak weekly percentages of deaths attributable to P&I ranged from 8.7% during the 2011–12 season to 11.1% during the 2012–13 season.